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& ethics "newsweek"ly is provided by -- >>> welcome. it's good to have you with us. as the country observes the ninth anniversary of the september 11th terrorist attacks, there's been an extraordinary national conversation about the challenges of religious diversity and the boundaries of tolerance. there were protests and condemnations from around the world over a small independent florida church's threatened plan to burn the koran. secretary of state hillary clinton called the plan disrespectful and disgraceful. and general david petraeus, the top u.s. and nato commander in afghanistan and defense secretary robert gates said the act could endanger american troops. the debate came on top of another controversy over plans to build an islamic cultural center near the site of ground zero in new york. at a news conference on friday, president obama called for religious tolerance. >> we have to make sure that we don't start turning on each other, and i will do everything that i can as long as i'm president of the united states to remind the american people that we are one nation under god and we
're already important for us. because many conflicts are around us. so therefore our attempt, our word and our insistence to contribute to the solution of the problems is appreciated. >> couric: and the prime minister of the palestinian authority, salam fayyad. >> it's one that's based definitely on dealing violence out of the equation for sure. that's our interest. that's how we defined it. from our point of view. it happens to be consistent with obligations that we took on the road map and going back to 1993. it's in our best interest, we're not doing no one else a favor but ourselves when we subscribe to nonviolence. as a really key component to what we have to do to get to freedom. >> couric: a program note: our interview with the c.e.o. of google, eric schmidt, will be seen at a later date. tonight, the president of turkey and the prime minister of the palestinian authority when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: abdullah gul is here, he's the president of turkey, a key u.s. ally and nato member, turke
to the u.s. military. it has seen some of the most ferocious fighting. nearly a third of british fatalities have occurred there. this latest transfer of responsibility is bound to raise a question -- are the british pulling out with their tails between their legs or is this simply a sensible deployment now that there are more u.s. troops on the ground. our correspondent reports now from sangin. >> five bloody summers in hellman's. 337 british lives lost and almost a third of all deaths happened here, in the most dangerous district of all, sangin. with the last journalist to visit, and hand over to u.s. forces. a time to reflect an for hard questions about the sacrifices that have been made. >> it has to be hard moment -- would be completely wrong or almost immoral of me not to sort of question what is we are doing. it is a sort of natural reaction every time there is a regrettable loss of life. but i think those sorts of moments could be overcome. >> we joint british and u.s. marines and to prepare for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons. >> i
by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. there are a lot of people missing st
joined british and u.s. marines as they prepared for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons and reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show us what they achieved, all the project have -- how the province has prospered and how much safer and has become, but this is what we saw. [gunshots fired] a brutal fight for much of the day. it does not happen much anymore, but it shows the taliban battling coalition troops. and now america must finish the job britain started. no british troops at this time, they have faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about. without someone having been there, you cannot describe the smells, the sites, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to be there and, the emotions -- to have a true understanding of what people here go through. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet mellon for the troops. there happen -- they are happy to be going, but their regret the mission is far from over. >> the amount of effort, time, lives lost, i feel a little h
consequence and very impressive company. and social information will be used by google and by others, i should add, to make the quality of the results, the quality of the experience that much better. the pore we foe about what your friends do with your permission, and i need to say that about 500 times, we can actually use that to improve the experience you have of getting information that you care about. in our case what we're actually do something building social information into all of our products. so it won't be a social network the way people think of facebook but rather social information about who your friends are, people that you interact with. and we have various ways in which we will be collecting that information. >> we continue with the film wall street money never sleeps with the director all i ver stone and two of the jars, josh brolin and shia labeouf. >> the 2 o 008 market is more difficult to understand with credit default swaps and insurance and all that stuff. but we made it a background. that's the way we treated it. we treated the crisis, it's all
turned us into a zombie nation? or should we just go with the flow and embrace the brave new world of mood control? we'll ask new york magazine journalist ariel levy and washington psychiatrist dr. brian doyle. >> a.d.m. the nature of what's to come. >> welcome. ariel levy, you authored a cover story for "new york magazine" which we see here "what are you on?" and you described new york today to -- you say sound the alarm, there is a new drug epidemic in town and most of the city wants in on it. in certain circles of new york, it is regular table conversation. we have entered the golden age of self-medication. drugs have become like hair products or cosmetics. this is brain styling, not mind altering, and you have a serious point to make there, but what is the extent of what you see going on in new york? >> well, i mean, i think new york is the same town that brought you woody allen and brought you everybody having a psychiatrist. there not a great deal of stigma to being neurotic in new york. it is accepted to the point of maybe being desirable in certain circles. i think now that
will give you the headlines when we managed to rebound. >> thank you very much. let us take a look at some of the other stories making headlines around the world. president barack obama is back a new company tax breaks in an attempt to regain the initiative as a midterm poll's loom. he is lobbying -- lobbying congress to let companies in the u.s. write off investment costs until 2011. what do business people think of this measure? a report from new jersey. all right -- let us go to washington now and talk to jake sherman. thank you for being with us. it really is not a particularly good time to be this particular president of the united states at the moment, at the polls are right. >> no, absolutely not. as you just mentioned. it is very difficult for this president. congress has been a lot of money revamping health care, saving family banks and other things that have gone along with the economic calamity we have been experiencing. and there is just not an appetite -- many did not see this appetite to spend more money, even if put tens of -- is potentially it could create jobs down the roa
? >> and the bill the rights, the u.s. charter. he was also interested in the revolutionary period. washington -- was fascinated to spend sometime with washington's documents. he knew a great deal about american history. he also knew a great deal about the american revolution, for example, that we like so many other democracies began with support from other countries. we began with french support. they have coalition support in iraq. he was well aware of the time that it took the us. to go from revolution to government, over a decade. he was interested in lincoln and the civil war. we talked a lot about lincoln and saw lincoln documents. then he had a very surprised q. he wanted to see documents of the precedence apparently really fascinates him, john quincy adams so we showed -- >> did he explain his interest? >> well, he didn't beyond the point that he was fascinated with the father son aspect of this adams senior -- bush senior, bush junior. >> i see. did he comment on anything like transparency of his from the documents? >> well, we tried to explain that we're an access agency and that ame
leaders have been getting down to business in their peace talks. that is the sentiment of the u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. the israeli president said there was no alternative to this peace process. our middle east correspondent is following the negotiations in jerusalem. he joins us now. >> even though details of very thin on the ground, the mood music surrounding these talks is said to be good. especially the americans talking up progress. of course, the americans, the israelis, and the palestinians are meeting here in jerusalem later today. >> today, mrs. clinton met with a man who ever witnessed -- a man who has witnessed every stage of the talks. despite that, israel's el this statemeneldest statement said -- >> i do not believe you can solve it in one or two meetings. >> i believe they are serious about reaching an agreement that results in two states living side by side in peace and security. that outcome is not only in the interest of both israelis and palestinians, it's in the interest of the united states and people everywhere. this is the time and these are t
europe faces us see us strikes as governments bareback cherished benefits. bbc news, paris. >> the spanish prime minister and has called on a basket separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. -- of basque separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. mozambique has reversed its decision to raise bread prices by 30%. food riots last week left 13 dead. bread will now be sold at its previous price of 14 cents. every year since 1998, more than 30,000 japanese people have killed themselves. japan's health ministry estimates cases of suicide and depression caused the economy $32 billion last year. the government has launched a task force to address the problem. more than two weeks of political deadlock have ended in australia with confirmation that labor's julia gillard will continue as prime minister, would be backing, at last, of to independenct mp's. she has been near west possible majority. nick bryant has this. >> it is like the finale of a tv reality show, with the winner kept a closely-guarded secret until announced live on television. it came down to two of the
and celebrate the explorer in all of us. >> and now "bbc newsnight." >> will he be judged in how he deals with [unintelligible] he was a child molester and drug addict and a leading figure in the catholic church. why was a vatican investigation halted? whoyman's guide to the man the theory that makes guide any relevance. >> i answer questions about life and everything. >> we explore the cultural legacy of the most talked-about bed. >> is that a hot water bottle or are you pleased to see me? the waterbed, is it the betting choice for the future? -- bedding choice? >> next week's visit to great britain by the pope is historic and highly controversial. he ran the vatican department charged with investigating miscreant priests. defenders say he was thwarted in major cases by another influential cardinal and his predecessor. peter marshall reports on inquiries into the most serious of these cases. >> what is truth? truitt sets you free. god is truth. -- trysta sets you free. sexual abuse in the church has been hidden for many years. what has been the role of joseph? first as cardinal and now a
different? steve assesses the chances. >> all together now, an ambitious u.s. president and the middle east leaders his urging to walk the path of peace. they have come to talk face-to- face for the first time in 20 months, and regions is that he is here in good faith. >> we will spare no effort, and we will work diligently, and tirelessly to ensure that these negotiations meet the goals and objectives in dealing with all the issues. >> president abbas, you're my partner in peace. it is up to less with the help of our friends to conclude the agonizing conflict between our peoples, and to afford them a new beginning. >> mr. abbas condemned the killing on tuesday of four jewish settlers on the was big. hamas said it was their work, and from their base in gaza rejected any compromise with israel. the palestinian president has a little room for maneuver with his own people divided. he has threatened to walk out of negotiations if israel presumes building when the partial ban ins at the end of this month. the post says that a middle east peace is in the national interest of america, and despite
. >> there is no way under the u.s. constitution that he can be stopped. >> that is perhaps the key point. america is not a country where you can just go and arrest someone for this. the first amendment says freedom of expression is protected, however painful that expression may be. >> james reynolds in washington, thank you very much. you will be informed on developments. firefighters in california are still battling to contain fires in the hills near sampras's go. they've been started by it was thought to be a gas blast near the airport. stephanie has this report. >> an entire neighborhood engulfed by fire. houses swallowed in flames. this town was rocked by huge explosions in its early evening. authorities do not yet know what caused the fire. this is a highly populated california suburb. they suspect a ghastly. as the flames went as high as 60 feet into the air, fire fighters struggled to cope. the tremendous heat of the inferno was almost overwhelming . eyewitnesses describe many who escaped as badly burned. with smoke clogging the skies, officials have told pilots to land planes. as the flam
that these sanctions have been a blessing in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not
and john elderfield take us on a tour of a new matisse exhibit at the museum of modern art. >> it's a period when matisse really seemed to have very intently stopped the kind of work he was doing before and began searching for something and we can chart him through the evolution of "bathers by a river" in fact and then i think through "the exhibition" trying different modes of painting. bringing together different styles, avant-garde styles of the time, ways of making the surface of works very different and reworked. and we watch him not sure where he's going but excited about the possibility of a new kind of art for himself and we feel that for matisse that was a kind of radical invention. he said about "bathers by a river" and "moroccans" that they were two of the most pivotal works of his career. i think it's important he used the word "pivotal" and not "important." it suggests there was a change that those works brought about in his career and i think that's part of what that radical invention is about. >> i think this was someone who had regularly changed but had done so in t
is a sports consultant for the newspaper did. thank you for being with us. how ingrained is the gambling industry in the game of cricket? >> i think it is hugely ingrained, but the differences like in england, india, or the sub-continent, betting is illegal. a large amount of the money invested goes unnoticed, no one knows who is betting, how much, or on what. >> are you then implying that expecting in cricket were legalized, it would remove some of this criminality that we have seen, for example, it in pakistan's tour of england? >> it would definitely help. for instance, this alleged bookmaker, the middle man who took a lot of money from a newspaper -- if he had bet legally, the money have gotten recorded in some shops in england. but if done in the sub- continent, no one knows how much money. in legalized betting would mean at least if you suspect some match, you can go back and track names, find out if someone has put in in unusual bet against the odd. if you find a large number having bet against the odds and having a huge winning exchanging hands because of that -- at least a good
, the bridge that has collapsed under its own weight, which have been used by thousands. no questions will be raised over the quality of construction -- now questions will be raised of the quality of construction. this was supposed to be india's coming out party, showcasing its global power. even now, organizers insist they are on top of things. >> the situation is under control. we are doing our best. we are confident we will be able to complete the entirety of the restoration. >> but not everyone is convinced. some officials say unless india acts quickly, the event could be in jeopardy. bbc news, delhi. >> next tuesday, there will be a conference, which is not news in itself, but this one is in north korea an extremely rare. the last time it happened, 30 years ago, kim jong-il succeeded his father. now with doubts about his health, there is speculation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. we have this from the south korean capital, seoul. >> this is the only photo of kim jong-un , taken two decades ago. almost nothing is known about him except that he comes from are ruthless
of the matter. u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell's assessment of the talks between israelis and palestinians. a senior vatican official describes the uk as a third world country. he has pulled out of the pope's statement. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america, also run the globe. coming up later, outside, the streets ring with protests. inside, france's lower house passes the bill which will raise the retirement age from 60 to 62, and serving therapy. can riding a wave help you call for mental health problems? public service is putting in health care money to find out. hello to you. millions -- yes, millions -- of people are going hungry at this moment across central and western africa. the worst affected country is niger, a country even larger than the united states of california and texas together, but with a population of just 15 million. the drought's amid flooding of ruined crops. help has not been enough. we go to niger for this special report. >> according to the united nations, in development terms, niger is the world's poorest nation. for the past year, the unite
warns against the dangers of secularism on his visit. the human cost of the u.s. financial downturn -- possibly -- poverty levels rise to their highest level in nearly 50 years. eu summit rows. the french president vows to press on. >> frenchmen and women have to know that this policy will continue while strictly abiding by the letter and spirit of our republican laws. >> welcome to "bbc world news" -- broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and also or around the globe. coming up later, women in a man's world. the dangers of being a female candidate in afghanistan's elections. and when millions of its people face hunger, why does niger continue to export food. -- why does niger continue to export food? hello. it is the first state visit by a pope since the 16th century when henry viii broke from rome and formed the anglican church. some 450 years later, this visit is not without controversy. the pope has been forced to of knowledge failings' over pedophile priests, and he issued a warning about the dangers of what he called aggressive secularism in britain. in a moment, a report
to the economy, but also to the president with a record low approval rating. >> the government is forcing us into a showdown. the only thing that can make as budget is a showdown. >> that showdown may force the government into further concessions, perhaps of face saver for the unions. two-thirds of the country are for reforms already approved by the house. it is president sarkozy who has the open hand. -- the upper hand. startednd's economy has to shrink again, despite coming out of recession earlier this year. gdp was down by 1.2% on the first quarter of the year. that contrasts with predictions it would have a small increase. the controversial diabetes drug avandia has been suspended. it has been linked to increased risk of heart failure. youtube and its owners have won a landmark piracy case brought by a spanish tv channel. each channel said its rights and violated when its videos were broadcast on youtube. the court found it was the copyright holder's responsibility to report the contents to youtube. the chairman for the international palate -- panel on climate change. it was reported th
writes the autobiography of our species. >> rose: right. >> so we are used to the story and we tell the story about the way we live. we train kid dpos to go to college. we train them in reasoning skills am we give them technical skills we have a series of strategies that people learn when they go into management. how to network, how to make decisions. and that is the story of human life told from the conscious level. but the revolution of consciousness tells us that below that level there's a more important and more fundamental level and more powerful and in some ways smarter level. and so my book is a description of life and the lives of two people told from that, of that underlevel. >> rose: the lives of two people. >> yeah, i make up characters. i have fictional characters just so exempt few. >> rose: but tell us about what you have found out about the unconscious mind. >> a couple things are important. the first is that we're shaped in so many ways by these unconscious decisions. in trivial ways, i mention by a study by a guy in buffalo that people named dennis are disproportion
east peace deal at a critical point. today, hillary clinton is in the west bank. the u.s. secretary of state holds stock with palestinian leader abbas. the settlement issue poses a massive challenge. >> welcome to gmt. also in the program, hopes rise for a quicker rescue of the chilean miners. hundreds of thousands joined the party in mexico to celebrate to lanier's of independence. it is midday in london and in washington, they're just waking up to the news that the obama administration is ramping up its efforts to inject momentum into middle east peace negotiations. today, hillary clinton has been in the west bank for talks with the president of the palestinian authority, president abbas. that follows talks between a bas and netanyahu yesterday. >> pressing on with the american peace mission, hillary clinton met the palestinian president. >> the united states and all of us led by president obama are very committed and determined to work toward a peace agreement through direct negotiations that lead to an independent, sovereign, viable palestinian state that realizes the aspiration
ago was the closest in modern memory. the australian people told us and they told us this in no uncertain terms on that date and in the days that have followed is this. we will be held more accountable than ever before. >> last week, tony abbott described himself as the head of a government in waiting. today, he was forced to concede defeat. >> the coalition won more votes and more seats than our p opponent, but sadly we did not get a chance to form a government. >> australia has grown used to strong and decisive government. this one looks altogether more fragile and raises the obvious question. how long will it last? >> one way you can cemented this government together is to spend a lot of money. julia gillard has started doing just that. she has promised almost 10 billion australian dollars to education and development. given the narrowness of the parliamentary majority now, all it would take would be for the liberal government to lose a single election sometime over the next few years, and australia would have to return to the polls. >> does that mean that you will
they stay mentally and physically hit. we have an expert giving us insight into how they're coping. >> they are surviving as a group. not as a bunch of individuals. the psychological management from the surface takes that into account. we are dealing with them as a group and we understand that the secret of their well-being is treating them as a group and not as different individuals. >> speaking to my colleague, timothy wilcox, he joins us live from the mine had. tim, obviously rejoicing, we have seen the pictures, but the fact of the matter is that there is sort of a long ways to go. >> absolutely right. no one is getting any precise readings on when this could be brought to the surface, although we are hearing that it could be sooner than the beginning of november. the man that you were just listening to their, he was saying within a month. we could be looking at the middle of next month. drilling, as seen behind me, moving in from the oil industry, continuing all live long, yesterday reaching 78 meters with a capacity for drilling a very wide bore very quickly, but it keeps on
said that the case was an attempt to smear his web site after thousands of secret u.s. military files were published. crowds protest against rising prices, blocking roads with burning tires, throwing stones at the police, who responded by firing into the air. protesting the recent rises in fuel, cement, and central foods. the two men from yemen held at an amsterdam airport were unlikely to be involved in, allowed onto a united airlines their flame in chicago. u.s. investigators believe that they did not even know each other and have cautioned against jumping to any conclusions. george? back you. >> you are watching gm t. as american forces finished their combat duties in iraq, one of the main actors in the invasion of myths that he failed to anticipate what would happen after the overthrow of saddam hussein. in his memoirs, tony blair speaks his mind about international and domestic politics. the bbc has secured the first television interview ahead of the -- the book launch. >> three years since tony blair left downing street, still it is the war in iraq that casts a long shadow over
and women in the u.s. military stays in place. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and night will soon be falling in parts of the arctic. the latest battleground in the fight to exploit the world resources. politicians are meeting in moscow to discuss this. canada, the united states, russia, and some scandinavian countries are trying to assert their rights. in a moment, we'll hear the view from canada and norway. >> a record-breaking voyage by russian ships this summer through the shrinking size of the arctic sea. shrinking -- ice of the arctic sea. a new, fast route for russian energy exports to asia. we were taken on board the nuclear-powered ice breaker, which led the way just before the final leg of the journey. the russians keen to publicize how quickly they're exploiting the effects of climate change in the arctic. >> at the moment, this and the other ice breakers are needed to score the cargo ships safely through the northeast passage. according to many predictions, within 20 years, there will be no ice here at all. that means this could be an extremely busy shipping l
. it was leaked to the u.s. media somehow. people always say that it was a deliberate leak. i do not think it was. i do not think they have tourr in of criminal evidence arrest anybody. >> thank you india has launched a biometric id scheme. it will put more than 1 billion citizens on a database. it is hoping the database will give an accurate picture of indian society. the european commission appears set to defer legal action against france over its expulsion of thousands of roma migrants. a senior european commissioner compared to events during world war ii. the u.s. senate is investigating the release of the lockerbie bombing. medical experts and state department officials will be questioned about the scottish departments decision. key witnesses from the uk have rejected requests to attend. are scotland correspondent reports. >> it has been months since he was freed from prison to fly home to his family and libya. he was released on compassionate grounds by scottish government. >> imposed by a higher power, is rts in anyo course in a jurisdiction in any land can revoke or overruled. it is final
this was due to hedge funds. either way, crop specialists tell us the yield swings are here to stay. >> the good news is that a global harvest has been pretty good this year. the united nations food and agricultural organization says it does not see a repetition of the food crisis of three years ago, but it does want collective action to try to reduce turbulence in global food commodity markets. >> he told me why the russian job will cast a long shadow. >> russia harvested a lot less than expected to in 2010. it has now planted a lot less for the 2011 harvest. these are short-term factors, which will cause a spike in prices. it could last for 12 months, or maybe longer. we can confidently expect, i would say, prices of commodities will come down again when we get a pattern of high yields and less climate shocks in the future. >> that governmental committee in rome might call for higher emergency stops and greater transparency and serial transactions. the eu commission wants it extended to control such raw materials trading. others feel that those moves are misguided. >> i would say
hirsi ali wrote a book about why she left islam. >> i would never use the expression anti-islamic sentiment. i think it's more precise to distinguish between political islam on the one hand and religious islam and spiritual islam. and i have seen, yes, a growing knowledge on political islam, a growing interest in political islam, and a growing condemnation of political islam by more and more americans. i find both american men and women audiences that i speak condemn practices in the name of islam against women, the forced veiling of women, forced marriages of women, the guardian principle. there have been some eye-catching stories, for instance the 18-year old yemeni girl who was married off to an 80-year old man and who managed to escape that. so there is condemnation of these practices and there is condemnation of honor killings, condemnation of female genital mutilation. that is not a command in the koran, but in some obscure hadith, but practiced widely in muslim countries and among muslim immigrants to the u.s. >> so, does the thing that ms. a alreadyi mention done a
experience. and we keep moving forward. that is why we encourage and celebrate the explorer in all of us. >> and now "bbc newsnight." >> international pressure mounts on iran but would make a difference? -- will it make a difference? this week, as president obama calls for iran to demonstrate a clear and credible commitment to a peaceful nuclear program, we take a look at the internal and external pressures facing iran as tensions continue with the west. >> the united states and the international community seek a resolution to our differences with iran and the door remains open to diplomacy should they choose to walk through it. >> the british citizens detained in bahrain claim that what they were tortured. what is wrong with pakistan? we will discuss this with out what the country has to say for themselves. >> what is that? >> you might know that some but do you know who wrote it? the director takes on a screen writer who feels undervalued. >> president obama does not have to go very far to find enemy is these days, he has plenty at home. it was with some relief that he faced mahmoud ah
from the u.s. he is called barbie. mexico argues that most of the weapons that the drug cartels use come from the u.s. the border situation is a difficult situation for both countries. >> thank you. sidecar bomber in the russian caucasus has quellekilled at le2 people. it was in the city of vladikavkaz in north ossetia. officials say the bomber blew up his vehicle by the main entrance to the market. the european parliament has passed a resolution calling on european governments to respect the rights of roman people. thas follows france's deportation of thousands of roman migrants. taliban leader mullah omar says his fighters are winning the war in afghanistan and that the nato led campaign has been a complete failure. those are his words. in a rare statement, he called on president obama to withdraw his troops unconditionally and as soon as possible. staying with afghanistan, in just over one hour, the british parliament will have a chance to debate and vote on the war against a taliban. british forces have been involved since the start of the conflict, but it is the first time the
. four simple words mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from london, a special edition of "charlie rose." >> charlie: lord peter mandelson is here. he's a member of britain's how was lords, former cabinet minister under prime ministers tony blair and gordon brown, a key architect of the labour campaign that helped his party rise to power in 1997. he served as secretary of state for trade and industry, secretary of state for northern ireland and secretary of state for business. he has now written a book about those years of public service. it is called "the third man, life at the heart of new labour," i am pleased to have peter mandelson back on this program. welcome. >> nice to be back. >> charlie: let me get to some of the controversy first. that tony blair is not happy that your book is coming out as it did, because -- and that somehow it's created a li
through literature and you can find out by talking. and you can find out by using your imagination. and for an appelate judge that's important. because when you're in that room, as you are, and writing and reading, what you are goinging to write is going to affect other people. so it's very important to have the imagination to try to understand how your opinions and your decisions will affect the lives of others. >> rose: why are things that you read like literature important to a judge? >> i told a group of undergraduates here in new york a few weeks ago when i was asked that question. and i said it's like knowing a foreign language or reading a novel. we only have one life. and we only really know our own. but by reading novels and by reading what other people have written about life, and about different ways of living, you can lead more lives than your own. and you can understand how people could have lived a quite different life. and that's a wonderful privilege to be able to do that as well as i think a necessity for someone whose's goinging to affect the lives of other people
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